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Verb type crossovers

Occasionally some verbs may cross into the conjugation patterns of other verb types, some of which are subject to consonant gradation.

While the conjugating of verbs usually follow specific patterns respective to their verb type there are some exceptions where certain verbs of a type get conjugated with the pattern of another type. This can be quite confusing for learners who may only first become aware of such differences when corrected by a native speaker or by coming across such conjugations in text.

Type 4 verb crossover

Normally with type 4 verbs it is expected to see the -vta/-vtä (vowel+ta/tä) ending drop the -t, gradate any applicable consonants, followed by adding the personal ending. When some type 4 verbs instead conjugate as type 6 it is so that the final -ta/tä drops, -ne is added, followed by adding the personal ending.

Some type 4 verbs that get conjugated as type 6 verbs include:

Type 5 verb crossover

Normally with type 5 verbs it is expected to see the -ita/-itä ending drop the final -ta/tä, adding tse and the personal ending. When some type 5 verbs instead conjugate as type 4 it is so that the final -t drops, followed by adding the personal ending.

Some type 5 verbs that get conjugated as type 4 verbs include:

Type 6 verb crossover

Normally with type 6 verbs it is expected to see the -eta/etä ending drop the final -ta/tä, gradate any applicable consonants, followed by adding the personal ending. When some type 6 verbs instead conjugate as type 4 it is so that the final -ta/tä drops, followed by adding the personal ending.

Some type 6 verbs that get conjugated as type 4 verbs include:

More type 6 verbs that conjugate as type 4